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ENGL480 Literary Studies Seminarhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL480 LITERARY STUDIES.jpgENGL480 Literary Studies SeminarQueer Archives<p>​In this capstone experience, you will combine your literary studies with skills in archival research and public humanities to explore the world of LGBTQ+ movements of the 1960s to the present. You will read science fiction, zines, and pulp novels while also exploring photograph albums, ephemera, and other queer archival objects in UD's Special Collections. Each student will develop an individual writing project based on the course themes; at the end of the semester, the class will work as a team to create a pop-up exhibition and public symposium.<br></p><p>Open first only to English majors graduating in Spring or Summer 2022.</p><p>ENGL 480 satisfies the:</p><ul><li>English and University Capstone</li><li>University Discovery Learning Experience</li><li>Graduating senior English majors given enrollment priority<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL462 Experiential Learninghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E462_McGuire_EPortfolio_455.PNGENGL462 Experiential LearningWriting Healthcare for All<p>Scholars will develop professional documents for community organizations in Wilmington, DE via UD's Mobile Health Initiative. In addition to communicating with community members and actively listening to their experiences with COVID 19 and other health outcomes, scholars will compose meaningful, usable professional documents like infographics, datasheets, technical instructions, PowerPoints, and flyers. At the end of the term, scholars will present materials to community partners and engage in dialogue about community engagement. Scholars will read about the importance of community writing, hone rhetorical listening skills, write equitably by honoring community partners, and connect professional writing skills to real world professional communication situations.</p><p>ENGL 462:</p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Is reserved for Senior/Junior English majors to satisfy the English Capstone requirement.  </li><li>Satisfies the university Discovery Learning Experience (DLE) requirement and the University Capstone requirement.</li></ul><ul><li>Graduating senior English majors given enrollment priority​<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL416 Designing Online Informationhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E416_455.JPGENGL416 Designing Online Information<p></p><p>We'll focus on the planning, design, and creation of information that is meant to be delivered and displayed via the web. For those considering careers in web development, content management, technical communications, editing, copywriting, advertising, and other positions that focus on the written word, this course examines strategies for making web-based content effective and usable. We'll discuss how to create content that meets the needs of diverse audiences and how to structure content for effective scanning and reading.</p><p>ENGL 416 satisfies the Second Writing requirement.  Open to Interactive Media Minors.​<br></p>0
ENGL413 Topics in Professional Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL413-Race-Edwards.JPGENGL413 Topics in Professional WritingGetting Things Done: Writing & Designing for the User Experience<p></p><p><em>Manuals, user guides, quick-start guides, troubleshooting forums, how-to videos… </em>We've all experienced the frustration of trying to use bad instructions: unclear or missing steps, ambiguous and poorly annotated images, confusing organization and page layout, error-filled writing. Developing usable instructional materials requires specialized skills in writing, usability, and visual design—skills all employers value and that you will learn in this course. </p><p> Each week, we will create or manipulate several objects and work with diverse materials as we learn how to write effective instructions and other important documents: duct tape, candles, Rubik's cubes, origami designs, Lego bricks, playing cards, rope and neckties (for tying complex knots), maps and signs, solar eclipse viewers, electronic circuits and devices, eye tracking devices, and other objects. At least one of your assignments will be a video-based YouTube tutorial on a software topic.</p><p>This course is for students across the university who want to learn and apply guidelines for writing and designing usable documents that help people get things done in the world.  </p><p>ENGL 413 satisfies the Second Writing requirement.​<br></p>0
ENGL409 Topics in Journalismhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL409 Topics in Journalism.pngENGL409 Topics in JournalismMedical Writing<p>​ENGL409 - Medical Writing - Is Oprah a liar?  How about Dr. Oz? Students will read and write consumer science and medical stories across a variety of genres, analyzing content for bias and credibility.  We will look at peer-reviewed studies and talk to authors about how the media shares and misinterprets information. Students will also attend a gross anatomy class and help dissect a cadaver to understand the complexity of the medical system. <br>ENGL 409:</p><ul><li>Satisfies the College Second Writing requirement.</li><li>Can be taken up to 3 times when topics vary.<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL394 English Language: Rhetorical and Cultural Contextshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E394_455.JPGENGL394 English Language: Rhetorical and Cultural Contexts<div class="ExternalClassD1D313A603DD4C9F87837993E477AAB3"><p></p><p>ENGL 394 inquires into the English language: age; how it evolves; how it affects and is affected by socio-cultural, economic, political, and historical factors; and how we can use this knowledge productively when interacting with others and with all manner of texts. You will gain an appreciation of diversity in language across time periods, cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles. This knowledge is essential for any aspiring professional; for example, teachers need this awareness when planning for instruction and responding to student work. In a project designed to help you put your knowledge into practice, we will examine the notion of culturally relevant pedagogy and consider how it can guide us in crafting critical readings of and response to student writing. Course requirements include homework assignments such as conducting rhetorical analyses; co-teaching class; researching and making an oral presentation on an aspect of the English language that is of particular interest to you; and compiling a course portfolio and end-of-semester reflection.</p><ul><li>English Education majors are urged to take LING101 and ENGL294 before ENGL394.</li><li>ENGL394 satisfies the Social & Behavioral Sciences Breadth requirement (Group C).​<br></li></ul></div>0
ENGL382 Studies in Multicultural Literature in Englishhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL382.pngENGL382 Studies in Multicultural Literature in EnglishSex & Violence in Asian American Lit<p>​This course surveys contemporary Asian American Literature, focusing on two different ways that the human interaction is thematized: sex and violence.  Does sex always signify acceptance?  Does violence always indicate hatred?  We will examine these themes in light of historical traumas associated with migration (particularly connected with U.S. wars in Asia), and as figures of the contemporary American cultural landscape -- how does sexual politics work within minority communities, and what happens when people reach across divisions of gender, race, and sexual orientation? Texts will likely include: David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, Jessica Hagedorn's Dogeaters, David Mura's The Colors of Desire, and Lois-Ann Yamanaka's Blu's Hanging, Viet Nguyen's The Sympathizer (2016 Pulitzer Prize), and the 2019 and 2020 winners of the National Book Award for Fiction: Susan Choi's Trust Exercise and Charles Yu's Interior Chinatown.  Requirements: regular attendance and participation, and several essays (15 pages total) with multiple drafts required. Written assignments will incorporate historical research as well as critical analysis of literary texts. Midterm and final exam.</p><p> <br>ENGL 382 satisfies:</p><ul><li>A&S 2<sup>nd</sup> Writing Requirement </li><li>University and A&S Group B: History and Cultural Change requirement</li><li>Multicultural requirement for the University</li><li>The Diverse Literature Requirement for the English Major<br></li></ul><p><br><br></p>0
ENGL376 World Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E376_455.JPGENGL376 World Literature<p></p><p></p><p>​World literature brings unexpected lessons. Promising to take us beyond our own nation space to the global stage, it often returns to us the complexity of our own situation, asking us to engage with our own frames of reference and our own perspectives. Attending closely to narrative and style, we'll explore how world literature negotiates this distance between us, entangling literary and historical cultures, crossing genres, and blending times and places.</p><p>ENGL 376: </p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement in the English major.  </li><li>Satisfies the Diverse Literature requirement in the English Education major.  </li><li>Satisfies the A&S Second Writing requirement.</li><li>Satisfies the Multicultural and A&S Group A: Creative Arts & Humanities requirement<br></li></ul><p></p><br>0
ENGL374 Topics in Rhetorichttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 374 TOIPCS IN THETORIC.pngENGL374 Topics in RhetoricWriting in the Contact Zone<p>​How do you talk with people who don't share many of your beliefs and values? The critic Mary Louis Pratt has coined the term contact zone to describe spaces where people from different groups or cultures meet and sometimes come into conflict with one another. To write in the contact zone, then, is to try to cross boundaries, push past lines of difference. It's less about winning an argument than forging a connection—which is not always an easy task. In this course we'll explore some strategies for doing so.<br></p><p>ENGL 374:</p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Satisfies the College Second Writing requirement.</li><li>A&S Breadth Requirements: A&S GROUP A: Creative Arts and Humanities<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL373-011 Studies in Poetryhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 373.JPGENGL373-011 Studies in PoetryPoetry as Equipment for Living<p>We're living in Interesting Times. Our spirits are battered and our hearts are hungry. Poetry is one of the ways humans, religious or not, feed their spirits. We'll read spirit-filling poems, write to help us process our hearts' bruises, and talk about how to use poetry to find peace in a wounded world, or use it to heal the world. Sometimes those poems will shout, sometimes they will whisper, sometimes they will laugh, sometimes they will cry. Sometimes they will pray, and sometimes they will howl. The heart needs its own voice, as well as a chorus of voices surrounding it. The times need witnesses. Poetry is one of the best witnesses, and poets are a great chorus. Expect to write daily, read aloud often, and learn poems by heart.<br></p><ul><li>College of Engineering Breadth Requirement</li><li>Satisfies the College Second Writing requirement</li></ul>0
ENGL373-010 Studies in Poetryhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 373 STUDIES IN POETRY.pngENGL373-010 Studies in PoetryPoetry and Place<p>Places like landscapes, cityscapes, a room in a house, can have a profound effect on us all, so it’s not surprising that poetry, is often shaped by, and maybe also shapes, the places around us. We’ll look broadly at a range of poets and the ways they write about place and then shift our focus to four important poets of the late-20th and early-21st centuries: Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, Derek Walcott, and A.E. Stallings. We’ll read these poets deeply and talk and write about their work. You’ll also have the opportunity to work on a multimedia project that will showcase some of what you’ve learned over the semester.​<br></p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>College of Engineering Breadth Requirement<br></li><li>Satisfies the College Second Writing requirement<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL371-011 Studies in Fictionhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 371 STUDIES IN FICTION_HORROR.pngENGL371-011 Studies in FictionHorror Stories<p>Spooky, ghostly, terrifying and weird… From Get Out to Dracula, the horror genre has used monstrous imagery to explore social problems. Beginning with the Gothic stories of the 19th century, this course surveys the tropes of horror fiction and the theoretical explanations for our obsession with creepy children, old houses, and things that go bump in the night. In addition to two movie screenings, this genre survey will include readings from classic and contemporary writers like Stephen King, Nathan Ballingrud, and Carmen Maria Machado. <br></p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Satisfies the College Second Writing requirement.<br><br></li></ul>0
ENGL371-010 Studies in Fictionhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 371 STUDIES IN FICTION.pngENGL371-010 Studies in FictionHarry Potter N.E.W.T. Level<p>​Come to Hogwarts to study advanced magic.  Read the seven books together with other advanced witches and wizards.  We'll also set aside some time to talk about the newest "Fantastic Beasts" film and to share what we know about the magical world.  All houses welcome!  <br></p><ul><li>Open to English/XEE majors only</li></ul><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>This section <strong>does not</strong> satisfy the College Second Writing requirement.<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL365-010 Literary Genres, Types, and Movementshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 365 LITERARY GENRES TYPES MOVEMENTS.pngENGL365-010 Literary Genres, Types, and MovementsViolent Women<p>​In this course, we will explore how cultures have imagined, condemned, and celebrated women who violently break the rules. Over the term, we will consider outlaw women, murderers, revengers, superheroes, and beautiful monsters. We will read novels and poetry, watch films, analyze visual art, discuss the work of psychologists and criminologists, and read sensationalist newspaper pieces. Along the way, we will ask questions about how class, race, sexuality, and gender shape how we understand women's activities, both real and imagined. <br></p><p>ENGL 365 satisfies the:</p><ul><li>College Second Writing requirement</li><li>Group A:  Creative Arts & Humanities requirement<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL361 Studies in Literary Criticism and Theoryhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL361 Comics and Graphic Novels.pngENGL361 Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory"Comics & Graphic Novels"<p>​From caped crusaders to intimate autobiography, comic books and graphic novels contain a wide range of characters and stories. And while they might seem like mere “pop” or guilty pleasures, comics invite careful and critical reading. They ask us to engage with both image and word—to reflect on how meaning is made on the page and what it means to read. In this course, we’ll read some of the most famous comics and graphic novels, developing techniques for reading “sequential art” along the way. We’ll study the history of the medium from its origin in turn-of-the-century newspaper comic strips to recent work by graphic novelists. We will also consider the impact of digitization on the medium, as e-comics become ever more popular and innovative. By taking “the funnies” seriously, we'll uncover the way that comics—and, more generally, narrative—work.<br></p><p>ENGL 361 satisfies the:<br></p><ul><li>College Second Writing requirement</li><li>Textual Analysis and Production requirement for the English major​</li></ul><p></p>0
ENGL338 Studies in Victorian Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 338 VICTORIAN LITERATURE.jpgENGL338 Studies in Victorian LiteratureReading the Victorians (online asynchronous)<p>​If the digital screen is the signature medium of our lives, the equivalent for the Victorians was the printed page. For this was the first age of mass publishing and reading. Newspapers. Magazines. Thousands and thousands of novels. It was, as Dickens once said, a time when he could imagine “motes of new books in the dirty air" of the London streets through which he walked.  As we explore this period, we'll try to answer the questions, “what does Victorian mean?" and “what does British signify?" To do this, we'll examine how the Victorians made sense of their universe through the printed page, above all through the short stories, novels, and life writing through which they described the age.</p><p>ENGL 338 satisfies the:</p><ul><li>College Second Writing requirement</li><li>Group A:  Creative Arts & Humanities requirement<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL334 Studies in Environmental Humanitieshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 334 ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES.pngENGL334 Studies in Environmental HumanitiesEnvironmental Justice<p>​<br></p><p>The last several years have focused the country's attention on the parallel crises of environmental catastrophe (climate change, but also global species collapse, deforestation; ocean acidification) and systemic and historical racial injustice. In this class we will explore how the two issues have always been tangled together, with similar roots and dire (and predictable) consequences. In addition to examining a variety of environmental issues, from land use and industrial food production to collapsing biodiversity and the legacy of poor public policy, we will especially explore Native American and African-American history to see how we have arrived at a time in which both social and ecological systems have been damaged, and how we might envision a more just, equitable, and sustainable future. Our class will also engage with a variety of community reforestation and food justice projects.</p><p>ENGL 334 satisfies the:</p><ul><li>Group B: History & Cultural Change requirement</li><li>College Second Writing requirement<br><br></li></ul>0
ENGL324 Shakespearehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E324_Sp18_455.JPGENGL324 Shakespeare<div class="ExternalClass0CDDE60B6C0A4C639D2DCB3A4A292837"><p>William Shakespeare died over 400 years ago. If he was anyone else, we might all be forgiven for asking "Shake-who?" But, no, Shakespeare lives on, his body, his being (apparently) translated into plays and poems whose scripts we still inhabit. ENGL 324 asks why that may be the case? How is it that these plays and poems and so the name that is "Shakespeare" survives? And, perhaps, more importantly, what does it mean to read and see Shakespeare's plays today? What kinds of meaning can we derive from them? Focusing on a range of plays as they were performed in Shakespeare's England and their adaptation to TV, film, and other media, please join us for this crash course in, not just a writer, but also in a cultural phenomenon.​ </p> <p>ENGL 324 satisfies a Group A: Creative Arts & Humanities Breadth requirement.</p></div>0
ENGL318 Studies in Filmhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 318_FILM.pngENGL318 Studies in FilmThe Femme Fatale<p>This course uses the figure of the femme fatale, the beautiful but treacherous woman who leads the male hero into love, crime, and often death, to explore a series of films noirs from the decade following World War II, examine the often remarkable differences between these films and the novels or stories on which they were based, and trace the transformation of the femme fatale in more recent films that seek to refresh this figure for a post-feminist audience. We'll be especially interested in the ways movies like The Maltese Falcon, The Postman Always Rings Twice, and Devil in a Blue Dress transformed the best-selling novels that inspired them, and the ways representations of the femme fatale have and haven't developed as Americans' attitudes toward female experience have changed over the past eighty years. ​<br></p><p>ENGL 318 satisfies </p><ul><li>Second Writing requirement.</li><li>Group A: Creative Arts & Humanities Breadth requirement.<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL312 Written Communications in Businesshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E3122_455.JPGENGL312 Written Communications in Business<div class="ExternalClass546217E60A124D4E979AE9109BFB8AB6"><p>Examines the role of written communication in corporate decision making. You will write memos, letters, proposals and reports that simulate on-the-job communication tasks. You're encouraged to use materials from your field of specialization. </p><p>ENGL 312 satisfies the Second Writing requirement.</p></div>0
ENGL309 Feature and Magazine Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/image006.pngENGL309 Feature and Magazine Writing<p>​In this class we will study and practice the craft of nonfiction storytelling. We will read a series of books and magazine articles and watch films made by veteran journalists, trying to understand not just the topics they cover but the strategies they use in their writing and visual storytelling. And we will practice composing pieces of our own, in a variety of forms: newspaper-style reporting; opinion writing; and personal essays. We will primarily discuss the exploration, research, reporting, structuring, writing and editing of longer pieces of nonfiction, especially newspaper- and magazine-style features.​<br></p>0
ENGL308 Reporter's Practicumhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E308_455.JPGENGL308 Reporter's Practicum<p class="ExternalClass7749715A54F945D8BEDFA521DD4C1EB2">Builds on ENGL307 with extensive reporting and writing for the campus newspaper. Attention to libel and privacy issues.</p><p class="ExternalClass7749715A54F945D8BEDFA521DD4C1EB2">ENGL 308 satisfies:</p><div class="ExternalClass7749715A54F945D8BEDFA521DD4C1EB2"><ul><li>The Second Writing Requirement<br></li><li>The university Discovery Learning Experience (DLE) Requirement<br></li></ul></div>0
ENGL306-011 Topics in Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 306-Hutchinson-Writing for the small screen.PNGENGL306-011 Topics in WritingWriting for the Small Screen<p></p><p></p><p>As the world is on lockdown, there's never been a higher demand for streaming media entertainment. All small-screen comedies, dramadies, action, sci-fi, detective shows, horror, docu-dramas and any other genres you can think of, start in a Writers Room (even Zoom writing rooms) with a show-runner and group of writers developing characters, story lines, and dialogue. You'll share that experience in this script workshop where your ideas and talent compete, clash, complement, and ultimately mesh with the talent of others.</p><ul><li>Satisfies the Second Writing Requirement</li><li>Can be taken up to 3 times when topics vary</li></ul><p> </p>0
ENGL306-010 Topics in Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 306_TOPICS_SCI FI.jpgENGL306-010 Topics in WritingSci-Fi & Fantasy Writing<p>This creative writing seminar focuses on the craft of writing science fiction and fantasy.  Taking authors like Kelly Link and Neil Gaiman as sources of inspiration, we'll practice craft elements important to popular fiction: writing action scenes, maintaining plot tension, writing complex characters, and worldbuilding.  Our practical focus emphasizes how to sell fiction to professional markets.  Previous creative writing experience is recommended.<br> <br>ENGL 306:</p><p>Open to English and English Ed Majors only<br> •Satisfies the Second Writing Requirement<br> •Can be taken up to 3 times when topics vary​<br></p>0
ENGL305 Fiction Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E305_455.JPGENGL305 Fiction Writing<div class="ExternalClass7B47F9B8AF25489B8A312AC14EBA2076"><p></p><p>You will create and improve your fiction writing the short story in particular and receive guidance in both writing and revising your work. In addition to writing short stories, you'll also read and respond to the writings of workshop peers. Together, we'll work towards developing the sensibility to offer tactful and valuable aesthetic responses to the writing of others, both published writers and your peers in the workshop. You'll learn to respond to your own writing as objectively as possible. The aim is to grow in your knowledge of contemporary writings, authors, and journals in the field.</p><p>ENGL 305 reserved for English & English Ed majors only.​<br></p><p><br></p></div>0
ENGL304 Poetry Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E304_455.JPGENGL304 Poetry Writing<div class="ExternalClass7037D9CA251346C1890E54AA23362049"><p></p><p>We will read, commit to memory, and recite poems. We'll examine and discuss poetic techniques. Over the semester, you'll draft, workshop, revise, and complete a portfolio of 12 poems. Revision emphasis will be on shaping and opening your poems to make art with words.</p><p>ENGL 304 reserved for English majors and English Ed majors only.​<br></p><p><br></p></div>0
ENGL300-010 Intro to Literary Criticism & Theoryhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 300_INTRO LITERARY CRIT.jpgENGL300-010 Intro to Literary Criticism & TheoryLiterary Theory and the Gothic Impulse<p>​Haunted houses, ghostly figures, and malevolent forces. Mad scientists and fractured dreams. What drives our enduring fascination with texts that explore these ideas and images? All are elements of the gothic and they reside abundantly in literary and cultural texts. This introductory class on Literary Criticism and Theory examines various methods of reading that help us understand how and why we are fascinated with the subjects that haunt the “Gothic impulse." From classic novels like <em>Frankenstein</em> and <em>Dracula</em> to popular films like <em>Psycho</em> and <em>Get Out</em>, we will use influential theories of reading texts (Psychoanalysis, Deconstruction, Political Criticism, Race and Gender Theory) to help us understand the driving impulses behind the Gothic. What might this genre, particularly with its flexible elements of horror and the macabre, tell us about the ways we infuse cultural texts with our cultural and individual anxieties?​<br></p>0
ENGL294 English Language: Grammar and Usagehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E294_455.JPGENGL294 English Language: Grammar and Usage<div class="ExternalClassA14CBDF53E3C408EBF0D05DC6356B54A"><p>ENGL 294 involves descriptive study of patterns and structures of language use, with an emphasis on standard written and spoken English; attention to punctuation, mechanics, and style. Intended for prospective English teachers.</p></div>0
ENGL278 Studies in Diversityhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 278_DIVERSITY.pngENGL278 Studies in DiversityBlack British Literature<p></p><p><span style="font-size:11pt;font-family:calibri, sans-serif;">By focusing on imaginative writing by British people of African, Caribbean, and South Asian descent, this course investigates the 'Blackness' and the 'Britishness' of contemporary British literature. As part of this project, it considers the historical contexts for this rich body of work, including British nostalgia for its imperial heyday, the tensions of the Thatcher era, and the anti-immigrant<br> sentiment behind the Brexit vote. Students will have the opportunity to read novels by Sam Selvon, Buchi Emecheta, and Bernardine Evaristo, as well as shorter works by Linton Kwesi Johnson, Jackie Kay, Grace Nichols, and Salman Rushdie, among others.</span></p><p><span style="font-size:11pt;font-family:calibri, sans-serif;"><br> ENGL 278 Counts to satisfy the Cultural Diversity Category in the English major.Satisfies the A&S Group B: History & Cultural Change Breadth Requirement.<br> <br> </span>​<br></p>0
ENGL230 Introduction to Environmental Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E230_455.PNGENGL230 Introduction to Environmental Literature<p></p><p></p><p>​What role does literature play in allowing us to appreciate the complex beauty of the natural world? How can art help us to both understand and feel the impacts of a changing climate? Our exploration of humanity's ethical and artistic connections to local and global environments offers reflection on our relationship to animals, plants and the places we call home. We'll read and respond to work reflecting a diverse range of perspectives influenced by race, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality.</p><p>ENGL 230:</p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Counts as a Group A: Creative Arts & Humanities Breadth Requirement.</li><li>Satisfies a required core course in the Environmental Humanities minor.<br></li></ul><p></p><br>0
ENGL227 Introduction to Creative Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 227_INTRO CREATIVE WRITING.jpgENGL227 Introduction to Creative Writing<p>​Creative writing is not just for personal pleasure. It's a valued skill in all careers and medias. Whether you're a corporate or marketing executive, a science professional, a public servant, or a social media producer, you're challenged to write interesting content that captures your audience's attention and compels them to engage in your message and point of view. Intro to Creative Writing helps you to:<br></p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Understand the craft of creative writing and its vocabulary</li><li>Read as a writer</li><li>Think critically by reading contemporary authors, poets, classmates, and your own writing</li><li>Practice creative ways to think and write </li><li>Establish intellectual discipline in daily writing </li><li>Learn strategies of revision </li><li>Use language rhetorically and effectively</li></ul><p>Satisfies the English “Textual Analysis and Production" requirement<br></p><p><br></p>0
ENGL217 Introduction to Filmhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E217_455.JPGENGL217 Introduction to Film<div class="ExternalClassFC906D83D848452FB3DDE97C2F9F9918"><p></p><p>This course combines an overview of the principal technical aspects of film (acting, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound, etc.) with a survey of some of the historical frameworks for understanding movies (national traditions, film genres, movie stars). The goal of the class is to develop a critical vocabulary for discussing film.  Weekly screenings (with mandatory attendance) will cover a wide range of movies, including Hollywood features, foreign films, experimental films, and documentaries.</p><p>Requirements include:  regular attendance, three exams, and several short writing assignments (approximately 15 pages total).</p><p>ENGL 217 </p><ul><li>satisfies the Creative Arts & Humanities Breadth Requirement.</li><li>Satisfies the English “Textual Analysis and Production" requirement​<br></li></ul></div>0
ENGL215 Introduction to Ethnic & Cultural Studieshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 215_INTRO TO ETHNIC CULTURAL.pngENGL215 Introduction to Ethnic & Cultural StudiesGlobalization and Power<p>This course explores what contemporary literature can teach us about identity, culture, and power in an interconnected global society. We will discuss the birth of ethnic studies from student protests for racial justice at American universities, and pivot from here to consider how race, gender, citizenship, and other vectors of power translate across countries. The course also explores how globalization––the movement of people, goods, capital, and ideas across national boundaries––has impacted literature and culture.<br></p><p>Including authors and filmmakers from various genres, geographies, and perspectives, our readings will broach how globalization and power are experienced in real and fictional places such as an apartment building in Rome, islands in the Caribbean and Pacific, a former slave castle in Ghana, the US/Mexico Border, a semi-truck in South Korea, a writers' conference in Cape Town, and international airports. Discussions and writing assignments will encourage comparison across different cultural contexts and reflection on how we can use literature as a lens for global study.<br></p><p>ENGL 215:</p><ul><li>Required for the World Cultures Concentration of the major in Global Studies</li><li>The University Multicultural requirement</li><li>Arts & Sciences Group B: History and Cultural Change</li><li>The Cultural Diversity requirement for the English major<br></li></ul>0
ENGL207 Introduction to Poetryhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E207_455.JPGENGL207 Introduction to Poetry<div class="ExternalClassC468500BFE1D4DCF84130986B01E6D62"><p></p><p>What is poetry? Why do we write it and why should we study it? Along the way, we'll look at the various tools poets use as they work their art. Discover the ways poets and poetry work. ENGL 207 will teach you to identify and use poetic terms, recognize poetic forms and techniques, read a poem closely, and respond to poetry in discussions, online postings and papers.</p><p>ENGL 207 satisfies the Group A: Creative Arts & Humanities Breadth Requirement.​<br></p><p> </p></div>0
ENGL206 British Literature 1660 to Presenthttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E206_455.JPGENGL206 British Literature 1660 to Present<div class="ExternalClass59B9D10F09BC40C5AF96DB261C87EC86"></div><p></p><div class="ExternalClass59B9D10F09BC40C5AF96DB261C87EC86"><p>I​magine all of the novels, poems, and plays that British authors have written from the 17th Century to today. The works would literally fill the streets of London and beyond. We'll sample these works to see how they reflected the culture of their times or advanced philosophical thought and social opinion.? We'll ask, what characteristics are unique to a particular literary period? How has literature changed or, in some ways, remained the same? Why do certain works have a more lasting impact than others? In the end, you'll practice the skills that help you to become a more critical reader as well as a more responsive writer.<br><br> ENGL 206:</p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Satisfies the History & Cultural Change Breadth Requirement</li><li>Satisfies the Literary History requirement in the English major</li><li>Counts as a British Literature requirement in the English Education major<br></li></ul></div><p></p><br>0
ENGL205 British Literature to 1660https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 205_BRIT LIT PRE 1660.pngENGL205 British Literature to 1660Heroes, villains, saints, witches, dragons, monsters, fantasy islands, and some seriously dysfunctional families. In a word . . . epic.<p>Study of representative Medieval and Renaissance British works, set in their historical and cultural contexts, introducing appropriate critical concepts.</p><p>ENGL 205:</p><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Satisfies the Literary History requirement in the English major</li><li>Satisfies the College of Arts & Sciences Group B: History & Cultural Change Breadth Requirement<br></li></ul>0
ENGL204 American Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/COURSE_E204_Wasserman_455.PNGENGL204 American Literature<p></p><p></p><p>In this course, we will survey “American Literature" from the early encounters in the 15th century to the late 20th century through a variety of texts (essays, speeches, autobiographical accounts, poetry, prose fiction, etc.). We will address such fundamental questions as: How has the concept of “America" evolved over time? How does the US's complex origins as a nation impact the development of specific literary styles and genres? What are the various ways American identity has been conceived and constructed out of the social conflicts of the nation's development? In what ways do we see the legacy of the works of the past inform our present conception of national identity? There is no denying we are at a moment in US history where the nation is polarized over how we answer these questions. The literature we will encounter in this course will allow us to engage these questions from a wide-range of perspectives. Our challenge as students of American culture in this class will be to balance our keen understanding of contemporary cultural politics with our examination of these documents of the past.</p><p>​ENGL 204:<br></p><ul><li>Satisfies the Literary History requirement in the English major</li><li>Satisfies a core requirement in the English Education major</li><li>Counts as a History & Cultural Change Breadth requirement<br></li></ul><p></p><br>0
ENGL202 Biblical and Classical Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 202_BILBICAL.pngENGL202 Biblical and Classical Literature<p>​Study of Greek, Roman, and Biblical literatures, set in their mythical, historical and cultural contexts, introducing appropriate critical concepts, addressing intriguing questions, and offering engaging discussions.<br><br> ENGL 202:</p><ul><li>A&S Group A: Arts & Humanities</li></ul><ul style="list-style-type:disc;"><li>Satisfies the Literary History requirement in the English major</li></ul><ul><li>Crosslisted with JWST202<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0
ENGL/WOMS 380-010 Women Writershttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL WOMS 380_WOMEN WRITERS.pngENGL/WOMS 380-010 Women WritersVirginia Woolf’s Queer Legacies<p>​This course examines the importance of Virginia Woolf's work, life, and reputation through a queer lens. Texts will include two novels by Woolf (Mrs. Dalloway and Orlando), along with adaptations by writers such as Michael Cunningham, filmmakers such as Sally Potter, and even fashion designers. We will also consider how the issue of Virginia Woolf's own sexuality has inspired representations of her biography across different media. Course requirements are daily discussion and in-class writing, two short papers and one longer essay, written through a draft-and-revision process.  <br></p><p>ENGL380 satisfies:  </p><ul><li>A&S Group A: Arts & Humanities</li><li>A&S 2<sup>nd</sup> Writing Requirement </li><li>Multicultural requirement for the University</li><li>The Diverse Literature Requirement for the English Major<br></li></ul><p><br></p>0

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