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ENGL 480: Literary Studies Seminar: HUMAN & NON-HUMAN IN CONTEMPORARY SPECULATIVE FICTIONShttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 480.jpgENGL 480: Literary Studies Seminar: HUMAN & NON-HUMAN IN CONTEMPORARY SPECULATIVE FICTIONS<p>​The special status humans have accorded themselves for the past several centuries (if not longer) has come under scrutiny in recent years, particularly as a result of the global climate crisis and social justice movements on behalf of women and people of color. Speculative fictions, whether in the form of fantasy novels, science fiction films, or climate focused narratives have provided a major venue for representations of interactions between humans and nonhumans, whether in the form of dragons, aliens, or ecosystems. In this course we will study a series of texts from various speculative genres alongside recent works of philosophy and criticism to explore major questions related to the status of the human and its limits. In addition to considering environmental issues such as sustainability and climate change, we will address the ways the human has functioned to bolster racial and gender hierarchies and restrict agency. We will read works by novelists such as N. K. Jemisin, William Gibson, and Jeff Vandermeer, along with philosophical writings by Jane Bennet, Bruno Latour, and Mel Y. Chen, and criticism by Amitav Ghosh and Mark Bould among others. Students will give in class presentations, write a research paper, and, ultimately, have the opportunity to present their work at a departmental event at the end of the term.​<br></p>0
ENGL 462: Experiential Learning: WRITING HEALTHCARE FOR ALL https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 462.jpgENGL 462: Experiential Learning: WRITING HEALTHCARE FOR ALL <p>​Develop professional documents for community organizations in Wilmington, DE via UD's Mobile Health Initiative. Scholars will compose usable professional documents like infographics, datasheets, technical instructions, PowerPoints, and flyers and present materials to community partners.​<br></p>0
ENGL 416: Designing Online Informationhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 416.jpgENGL 416: Designing Online Information<p>​We will focus on the design of information for the web. We will examine strategies for effective & inclusive design. Rhetorically, the course will study information and persuasion, focusing on audience and purpose, or user and task.​<br></p>0
ENGL 410: Technical Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 410.jpgENGL 410: Technical Writing<p>​Selected problems in technical communications, the preparation of reports and technical editing.​<br></p>0
ENGL 409: Topics in Journalism: ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISMhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 409.jpgENGL 409: Topics in Journalism: ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISM<p>​ In this class we will study and practice the craft of writing about the natural world and the complicated relationship people have with it. We will read a series of books and articles by veteran journalists; screen a series of excellent films; and spend considerable time in the field to try to understand not just topics worth writing about but the strategies environmental journalists use in composing their projects. And we will practice creating pieces of our own, in a variety of forms: newspaper-style reporting; natural history essays; and short digital projects. Topics to be discussed will include the change in the American landscape from city and farm to suburbs; the prevalence of toxic chemicals in our bodies and the environment; and the threats posted by climate change. We will pay especially close attention to the issue of Environmental Justice, which explore the pressures that environmental degradation places on our society's most vulnerable people.<br>         We will also spend a lot of time outdoors. A special feature of this class has always been field work. This semester, students will have the chance to engage with several primary projects: two in Baltimore (a reforestation project in an historically redlined neighborhood in West Baltimore; and an urban farm that provides free organic produce to a pair of food pantries). A third option may be to report on the restoration of Lenape tribal lands near Dover. I will keep you posted about both of these as we go along.  Students will be responsible for getting themselves to and from these sites.​<br></p>0
ENGL 394: English Language: Rhetorical and Cultural Contextshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 394.jpgENGL 394: English Language: Rhetorical and Cultural Contexts<p>​Inquiries into the English language: age; how it evolves; how it affects and is affected by socio-cultural, economic, political, and historical factors; and how we can use this knowledge productively when interacting with others and with all manner of texts. You will gain an appreciation of diversity in language across time periods, cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles. This knowledge is essential for any aspiring professional; for example, teachers need this awareness when planning for instruction and responding to student work. In a project designed to help you put your knowledge into practice, we will examine the notion of culturally relevant pedagogy and consider how it can guide us in crafting critical readings of and response to student writing. Course requirements include homework assignments such as conducting rhetorical analyses; co-teaching class; researching and making an oral presentation on an aspect of the English language that is of particular interest to you; and compiling a course portfolio and end-of-semester reflection.​<br></p>0
ENGL 385: Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory: Animals, Animality, and Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 385.jpgENGL 385: Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory: Animals, Animality, and Literature<p>Animals, writes anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, are “good to think with." They are good to read and write with too. It is difficult really to imagine stories that do not include animals. Sometimes they are bystanders; other times they are narrators; antagonists; metaphors; objects of allegory. So, what, this course asks, can animals do when they appear in stories? How are they used to mark the boundaries of humanness and how do they mediate matters of race, sexuality, and gender? Taking up questions of animal writing, the genre of the speaking animal story, and thinking hard about what writing is, this course introduces you to the emerging field of what is called “critical animal studies." In addition to reading key theoretical / philosophical texts on animal intelligence and the human, we will read a wide variety of fiction, poetry, children's literature, philosophy, science, history, and cultural theory​.<br></p>0
ENGL 381: WOMEN & LITERATURE OF ILLNESS https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 381.jpgENGL 381: WOMEN & LITERATURE OF ILLNESS <p>​This course presents work by women who have been healers of the sick; or who have experienced illness themselves; or who have been labeled "diseased" by virtue of their gender, as well as their race, their sexuality, their class, their disability status, etc. We will look at the history and the politics of mental and physical illnesses-focusing on topics such as cancer, eating disorders, and depression and their relationship to gender, as expressed in 19th through 21st century British and American texts by writers such as Florence Nightingale, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Virginia Woolf, etc as well as visual texts such as art, photography, and film.​<br></p>0
ENGL 376: World Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 376.jpgENGL 376: World Literature<p>​World literature brings unexpected lessons. Attending closely to narrative & style, we'll explore how world literature negotiates the distance between us, using literary and historical cultures, genres, and times and places.​<br></p>0
ENGL 372: Studies in Drama: DANGEROUS STAGES/WORLDS https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 372.jpgENGL 372: Studies in Drama: DANGEROUS STAGES/WORLDS <p>​The stage can be a place where radical ideas, provocative notions, and wild energy live and breathe, at least for a few hours. What would not be possible, acknowledged, or imagined in our daily lives, becomes an experience shared with actors on stage and the audience around us. Plays can remake us, and they can release us back into the world with new notions of who we are and what our world might be. Plays might encourage us to dress differently, live differently, speak differently, or love differently. They might also confirm those things we have always known, but that the world has yet to acknowledge. The stage is change. In this course, we will explore what it can do to and for us by reading plays from contemporary American writers such Danai Gurira, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Dominique Morisseau. We will explore ancient theater, like Euripides' still shocking Medea as well as more recent work, such as the autobiographical musical, Fun Home. This class is discussion-based, with papers, groupwork, and performance built in. Whenever possible, we will also consider local productions, speak to playwrights and actors, and visit performance spaces.​<br></p>0
ENGL 371: Studies in Fiction: HORROR STORIEShttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 371.jpgENGL 371: Studies in Fiction: HORROR STORIES<p>​Spooky, ghostly, terrifying and weird, From Get Out to Dracula, the horror genre has used monstrous imagery to explore social problems. In addition to two movie screenings, this genre survey will include readings from classic and contemporary writers.​<br></p>0
ENGL 365-011: Studies in Literary Genres, Types and Movements: BIPOC SCIENCE FICTIONhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 365 011.jpgENGL 365-011: Studies in Literary Genres, Types and Movements: BIPOC SCIENCE FICTION<p>​Over the past decade, speculative fiction has seen an explosion of works by peoples of color. Race has long been a topic in science fiction, see Star Trek for example, but until recent decades the writers of those texts remained emphatically white. We'll focus on a series of works by people of color, including N. K. Jemisin, Mat Johnson, Octavia Butler, and Cherie Dimaline. What has made speculative fictions particularly suited to the exploration of race in recent years? How do these writers of color play upon long established strategies from forms of speculative fiction?​<br></p>0
ENGL 365-010, 080: Studies in Literary Genres, Types and Movements: BLUE HUMANITIEShttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 365 010.jpgENGL 365-010, 080: Studies in Literary Genres, Types and Movements: BLUE HUMANITIES<p>​How do the blue humanities complicate our terrestrial ways of knowing and being in the world: our talk of “fields," feeling “grounded," or being “moored"? This course investigates watery thinking and its various interdisciplinary currents – like critical race, media, and animal studies – across a wide range of time periods and literary genres, from early modern drama to the modern-day documentary. We will pay particular attention to the perspectives of Black, Indigenous, and queer authors and the horizons they imagine. Readings will explore the Arctic, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans; city blueprints; fresh and salty streams; vapors, crystals, and waves; the passages of enslaved peoples and the sci-fi portals built around them; the hope of, and fight for, a sea-change in human political behavior. While weekly meetings will take place on a relatively dry campus, scheduled interdisciplinary discussions will highlight the wet sites that make up our not-so-solid state and its surrounding watershed. (Delaware, after all, happens to have the country's lowest mean elevation.) Together, we will ask: what openings do the blue humanities offer to environmental studies, and why should we follow their flows? What are their limitations – are they too focused on the “blue"? – and where else can they go?​<br></p>0
ENGL 330: The Detective in Film and Fictionhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 330.jpgENGL 330: The Detective in Film and Fiction<p>​Study of detective fiction and film has applications to a liberal arts approach to crime and justice. Blends literary analysis with the insights of social science research on the work of private and police detectives.​<br></p>0
ENGL 324: Shakespeare https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 324.jpgENGL 324: Shakespeare <p>​William Shakespeare died over 400 years ago. If he was anyone else, we might all be forgiven for asking "Shake-who?" But, no, Shakespeare lives on, his body, his being (apparently) translated into plays and poems whose scripts we still inhabit. ENGL 324 asks why that may be the case? How is it that these plays and poems and so the name that is "Shakespeare" survives? And, perhaps, more importantly, what does it mean to read and see Shakespeare's plays today? What kinds of meaning can we derive from them? Focusing on a range of plays as they were performed in Shakespeare's England and their adaptation to TV, film, and other media, please join us for this crash course in, not just a writer, but also in a cultural phenomenon. ​<br></p>0
ENGL 318: Studies in Film: INTRO TO TELEVISION STUDIES,https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 318.jpgENGL 318: Studies in Film: INTRO TO TELEVISION STUDIES,<p>​U.S. television in 1971: three commercial networks plus PBS.<br>            U.S. television in 2021: four major commercial networks, several minor networks, PBS, independent stations, basic cable, premium cable, Netflix, and other subscription services, Facebook Live, YouTube “channels," smart phones...<br>            Television has changed enormously in the last 50 years, enough so that some of the fundamental concepts in Television Studies in the 1970s (such as Raymond Williams' concept of “flow") need to be redefined, reconsidered, or indeed discarded. In this class we will survey many of these foundational pieces of TV Studies research and will learn about the history of the U.S. television industry. The objective is (first) to build a foundation in “classic" TV Studies so that we can (second) situate and interrogate our own consumption of television. We will pay particular attention to the theory and history of television genres with special attention to gender -- which is to say, we will look beyond prime-time television to consider soap operas, game shows, talk shows, sports highlights, children's programming, etc.<br>            In addition to assigned readings, we will have assigned screenings (probably streaming but possibly communal if conditions permit).<br>            Written work: a daily journal, several short writing assignments, midterm and final exams.<br>            Subscription to Netflix and Hulu required (NB: Hulu has a $1.99/month student rate).​<br></p>0
ENGL 317: Film History: ALTERNATIVE HOLLYWOODhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 317.jpgENGL 317: Film History: ALTERNATIVE HOLLYWOOD<p>​The history of the American cinema has been overwhelmingly white, male, straight, able-bodied, and able-minded, at least in most of the histories that have been written since the industry's childhood. Blacks, gays, transgender and disabled Americans, and women continue to be largely invisible in stories of Hollywood's early years, emerging only in recent years as triumphant avatars of contemporary broad-mindedness. This course aims to challenge two narratives of Hollywood history—the one that seeks to erase these marginal populations, and the one that brings them on only in the last act of the twenty-first century—not by presenting a truly comprehensive history of American film but by presenting some of the materials that might serve as the basis for more inclusive alternative histories yet to be constructed that include women's cinema, Black cinema, queer cinema, and disability cinema. The goal of the course is not to transmit either an orthodox, canonical history of Hollywood or a single insurgent history, but to encourage and empower you to start creating new Hollywood histories yourself by asking harder questions about the ways American movies have and haven't represented these and other minorities.​<br></p>0
ENGL 312: Written Communications in Business https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 312.jpgENGL 312: Written Communications in Business <p>​Examines the role of written communication in corporate decision making. You will write memos, letters, proposals and reports that simulate on-the-job communication tasks. You are encouraged to use materials from your field of specialization.​<br></p>0
ENGL 308: Reporter's Practicumhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 308.jpgENGL 308: Reporter's Practicum<p>​Builds on ENGL307 with extensive reporting and writing for the campus newspaper. Attention to libel and privacy issues. <br></p>0
ENGL 307: News Writing and Editinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 307.jpgENGL 307: News Writing and Editing<p>​News judgment, news gathering, feature writing, libel problems, and ethics. Assignments include writing for the campus newspaper. ​<br></p>0
ENGL 306-012: Topics in Writing: WRITING THAT PAYS THE RENT https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 306 011.jpgENGL 306-012: Topics in Writing: WRITING THAT PAYS THE RENT <p>​Develop the know-how, skills, and tools you'll need to earn a living with your writing or be successful as a copywriter, social media manager, etc. So, before you win your Pulitzer, you will likely have to earn a living writing stuff for other people. This class will give you the tools you'll need for that.​<br></p>0
ENGL 306-011: Topics in Writing: SCREENWRITING https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 306 010.jpgENGL 306-011: Topics in Writing: SCREENWRITING <p>​Everybody's got an idea for a screenplay. Fortunately, you can at least get academic credit for yours. Bring it to this class where you'll outline it, and write a first draft, and we'll read those pages aloud and offer feedback. ​<br></p>0
ENGL 305: Fiction Writing https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 305.jpgENGL 305: Fiction Writing <p>​You'll create and improve your fiction writing and receive guidance in writing and revising your work. We'll work towards offering aesthetic responses to other's writing, both published writers and your peers in the workshop.<br></p>0
ENGL 304: Poetry Writing https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 304.jpgENGL 304: Poetry Writing <p>​We'll read and recite poems. We'll examine and discuss poetic techniques. Over the semester, you'll draft, workshop, revise, and complete a portfolio. Revision will be on shaping and opening your poems to make art with words.​<br></p>0
ENGL 300: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 300.jpgENGL 300: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory <p>​Intrigued by strange-sounding words like "deconstruction," post-modernism, cyborgs, ideology, metaphor, metonymy, queer theory, cyborgs, cli fi, the canon? Over the course of the semester, we will discuss some of the major questions that literary critics wrestle with.<br></p>0
ENGL 294: English Language: Grammar and Usage https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 294.jpgENGL 294: English Language: Grammar and Usage <p>​<em>This course involves descriptive study of patterns and structures of language use, with an emphasis on standard written and spoken English; attention to punctuation, mechanics, and style. Intended for prospective English teachers.</em><br></p>0
ENGL 230: Introduction to Environmental Humanitieshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 230.jpgENGL 230: Introduction to Environmental Humanities<p>​What role does literature play in allowing us to appreciate the complex beauty of the natural world? How can art help us to both understand and feel the impacts of a changing climate? Our exploration of humanity's ethical and artistic connections to local and global environments offers reflection on our relationship to animals, plants and the places we call home. We'll read and respond to work reflecting a diverse range of perspectives influenced by race, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality.​<br></p>0
ENGL 227: Introduction to Creative Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 227.jpgENGL 227: Introduction to Creative Writing<p>​Creative writing is not just for personal pleasure. It's a valued skill in all careers and medias. Whether you're a corporate or marketing executive, a science professional, a public servant, or a social media producer, you're challenged to write interesting content that captures your audience's attention and compels them to engage in your message and point of view.​<br></p>0
ENGL 222: Introduction to Professional Writinghttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 222.jpgENGL 222: Introduction to Professional Writing<p>​Designed specifically for students want to explore professional writing careers, this course introduces the rhetorical theory, genre studies, and practical writing skills that form the basis of numerous professional writing and editing disciplines.​<br></p>0
ENGL 220: Introduction to Writing for Gameshttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 220.jpgENGL 220: Introduction to Writing for Games<p>​Basic principles of storytelling and narrative design for games. Working on individual and team projects, you'll practice craft elements important to game writing: working with game mechanics, developing compelling characters, maintaining tension, creating dialogue trees, and designing branching narratives. Current issues in gaming will also be discussed. ​<br></p>0
ENGL 217: Introduction to Filmhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 217.jpgENGL 217: Introduction to Film<p>​This course combines an overview of the principal technical aspects of film (acting, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound, etc.) with a survey of some of the historical frameworks for understanding movies (national traditions, film genres, movie stars). The goal of the class is to develop a critical vocabulary for discussing film.  Weekly screenings (with mandatory attendance) will cover a wide range of movies, including Hollywood features, foreign films, experimental films, and documentaries. ​<br></p>0
ENGL 216: African American Literature Surveyhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 216.jpgENGL 216: African American Literature Survey<p>From blues poetry to the jazz novel; from abolitionist sermons to Black Lives Matter manifestoes; from slave narratives to Afro-futurist fables: for more than two centuries, African American writers have mapped new possibilities for Black freedom, reconfigured the literary imagination, and called America to account. In this class, we will explore African American literature through close reading, but also by listening to speech and sound, looking at art and artifacts, studying the lives of authors, and restaging debates about the politics of Black writing. As we read novels, drama, essays, poetry, and memoir from the eighteenth century to the present, we will ask: What did these texts mean to readers then, and what do they mean to you now? ​<br></p>0
ENGL 215: Global Studies in Race, Culture, and Powerhttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 2015.jpgENGL 215: Global Studies in Race, Culture, and Power<p>​Climate change is real, it is here, and it is now.  But while the phenomenon may be global, the effects of it are not: populations in the Global South are more vulnerable to the harm of rising seas, increasing droughts, and more frequent superstorms. Even in areas of the Global North, political, economic, and social inequities contribute in significant ways to climate vulnerability. As a result, calls for “climate justice" are becoming increasingly urgent. But who defines climate justice, and how? Whose voices carry in these urgent conversations about what climate justice means? What do vulnerable communities on the front lines of climate crisis have to say about this subject? How do race and gender factor into these considerations? And what visions of just climate futures do writers, artists, and activists from around the world offer us? This course explores these and other important questions about what justice means, what it should look like in different locations, and how it can be pursued effectively in a warming world.​<br></p>0
ENGL 205: British Literature to 1660https://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 205.jpgENGL 205: British Literature to 1660<p>​Study of representative Medieval and Renaissance British works, set in their historical and cultural contexts, introducing appropriate critical concepts.<strong> </strong>​<br></p>0
ENGL 204: American Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 204.jpgENGL 204: American Literature<p>​In this course, we will survey “American Literature" from the early encounters in the 15th century to the late 20th century through a variety of texts (essays, speeches, autobiographical accounts, poetry, prose fiction, etc.). We will address such fundamental questions as: How has the concept of “America" evolved over time? How does the US's complex origins as a nation impact the development of specific literary styles and genres? What are the various ways American identity has been conceived and constructed out of the social conflicts of the nation's development? In what ways do we see the legacy of the works of the past inform our present conception of national identity? There is no denying we are at a moment in US history where the nation is polarized over how we answer these questions. The literature we will encounter in this course will allow us to engage these questions from a wide-range of perspectives. Our challenge as students of American culture in this class will be to balance our keen understanding of contemporary cultural politics with our examination of these documents of the past.​<br></p>0
ENGL 202: Biblical and Classical Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 202.jpgENGL 202: Biblical and Classical Literature<p>​Study of Greek, Roman, and Biblical literatures, set in their mythical, historical, and cultural contexts, introducing appropriate critical concepts, addressing intriguing questions, and offering engaging discussions.​<br></p>0
ENGL 201-011: Rewriting Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 201 011.jpgENGL 201-011: Rewriting Literature<p>​Most of the stories, poems, songs, plays, and films we encounter are revisions, adaptations, translations, transformations, and reactions to other texts. In this way, engaging with literature is both an act of reading (and the act of being inspired by reading) and, potentially, an act of writing. In “Rewriting Literature" we will explore poetry, the fairy tale, and the Greek myth, as texts that have been transformed and adapted in multiple ways over time, with each new text enhancing the text that preceded it. How have modern songwriters been inspired by classic poems to produce popular songs? How have writers and artists taken a fairy tale like “Little Red Riding Hood" and transformed it into an exploration of gender and sexuality in contemporary culture? What is the connection between the Greek myths of Prometheus and Pygmalion, Mary Shelley's classic novel Frankenstein, and Alex Garland's film Ex Machina? In addition to addressing these and related questions, we will also spend much of our time exploring our own transformations of these familiar stories by writing critical responses to them and by producing our own creative texts inspired by them.​<br></p>0
ENGL 201-010: Rewriting Literaturehttps://www.english.udel.edu/Courses/ENGL 201 010.jpgENGL 201-010: Rewriting Literature<p>​Love. Growing up. Journeys. Mysteries. In this course, we'll examine how writers have written and rewritten stories about these topics from the early nineteenth century to today. Reading works ranging from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice to Jesmyn Ward's Sing, Unburied, Sing, we'll think through what makes literature powerful and long-lasting in our ever-changing world. This course will include both analytical and creative work, as students will also “rewrite" literature themselves. You should expect to leave this class knowing how to find high-quality textual evidence, how to form an argument for an English paper, and how to find and then incorporate academic secondary sources that offer context for your arguments.​<br></p>0

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Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

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