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  • George Miller,

    114 Memorial Hall
    (302) 831-1972

    Biography

    George Miller is a Professor of English and a former Department administrator for twenty-six years (from 1976 to 1999 and again 2013 to 2017). He served in sequence, as Director of Composition, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Director of the Writing Program, Associate Chair, and finally Chair of the Department. He was also Convener of the Chairs' Caucus, a position to which he was elected by the other 70 chairs and directors within the University. He earned his B.A. and M.A. from The Pennsylvania State University; his Ph.D., with a minor in Philosophy, from the University of Connecticut, and his M. Div. from Lancaster Theological Seminary. His dissertation was on Milton's Paradise Lost. He has published seven books, two devoted to early American papermakers, three to American paper ephemera, one to a 17th-century English writer, and a widely-used college textbook that is just now going into its 11th edition. He has published widely in journals such as English Quarterly, Milton Quarterly, The Dickensian, Language and Style, Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, Cahiers elisabethains, Ariel, Modern Language Studies, Style, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, andTennessee Williams Review. In addition, he has written over 200 articles on American paper ephemera and popular culture in various popular magazines, historical society publications, and journals and papers specializing in ephemera. His current research concerns the nature of religious experience as it is embodied in texts which we as writers create and also texts in which writers attempt to embody or provoke a religious experience. His work in progress blends together medieval meditative practices used in lectio divina with modern composition and cognitive theory to explore a series of ways in which readers can respond to spiritual texts.

 

 

114 Memorial Hall<div class="ExternalClass9EA4EAB775BC40249F261A3F4C3FCA94">George Miller is a Professor of English and a former Department administrator for twenty-six years (from 1976 to 1999 and again 2013 to 2017). He served in sequence, as Director of Composition, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Director of the Writing Program, Associate Chair, and finally Chair of the Department. He was also Convener of the Chairs' Caucus, a position to which he was elected by the other 70 chairs and directors within the University. He earned his B.A. and M.A. from The Pennsylvania State University; his Ph.D., with a minor in Philosophy, from the University of Connecticut, and his M. Div. from Lancaster Theological Seminary. His dissertation was on Milton's Paradise Lost. He has published seven books, two devoted to early American papermakers, three to American paper ephemera, one to a 17th-century English writer, and a widely-used college textbook that is just now going into its 11th edition. He has published widely in journals such as English Quarterly, Milton Quarterly, The Dickensian, Language and Style, Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, Cahiers elisabethains, Ariel, Modern Language Studies, Style, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, andTennessee Williams Review. In addition, he has written over 200 articles on American paper ephemera and popular culture in various popular magazines, historical society publications, and journals and papers specializing in ephemera. His current research concerns the nature of religious experience as it is embodied in texts which we as writers create and also texts in which writers attempt to embody or provoke a religious experience. His work in progress blends together medieval meditative practices used in lectio divina with modern composition and cognitive theory to explore a series of ways in which readers can respond to spiritual texts.</div>miller@udel.eduMiller, George(302) 831-1972<img alt="" src="/Images%20Bios/FAC_Miller_George.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />ProfessorBritish LiteratureB.A. English, Penn State University; M.A. English, Penn State University; Ph.D. English, University of Connecticut

 

 

The Prentice Hall Reader, 12th EditionMiller, GeorgeJon MillerPearson2017https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/program/Miller-The-Prentice-Hall-Reader-12th-Edition/PGM328460.html<p><em>The Prentice Hall Reader</em> helps students organize their writing around structural patterns and engage in these patterns by reading. These patterns help students organize their knowledge to see different ways in which information can be conveyed. Most commonly used in academic writing, the structural patterns will guide students through skills such as narration, description, classification, comparison, explanation, analysis, definition, and argument – across all subject matter they may encounter in their academic work.</p><p>The 12th Edition expands on previous editions with 43 essays. This includes 26 new essays, 11 written by students, and 27 that employ examples of the organizational strategies emphasized throughout the book, used in academic and literary texts, and visuals. Readings are chosen based on how well they demonstrate a particular pattern of organization, appeal to an audience of first-year students, and promote interesting discussion and writing activities.<br></p>miller
A Delaware Album, 1900-1930Miller, GeorgeUniversity of Delaware PressNewark, DE2011http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/delaware-album-1900-1930-george-miller/1100230649The Album reproduces more than 300 photographs taken during the period from 1900 to 1930 and printed on postcards. Readers can witness the development of Delaware agriculture and fisheries, the expansion of the railroad into southern Delaware, the declining days of steamship service on Delaware rivers and creeks, the unsuccessful campaign against "King Alcohol," the summer visits to local amusement parks and beaches. Each photograph is accompanied by an essay caption and the images are arranged by the subjects depicted in the image, including views of cities and towns, Delaware beaches, amusements, agriculture and industry, transportation, schools, religion, and businesses. An appendix discusses the popularization of photography achieved through Kodak's 3A postcard camera and the Velox postal and why the photographic record of small-town America during this period exists almost entirely in postcard images.miller

 

 

The nature of religious experience as it is embodied in literary texts<p>​His current research comes in two parts, both of which concern the nature of religious experience as it is embodied in literary texts. My focus is on texts which we as writers create and also texts in which writers attempt to embody or provoke a religious experience. The first book, in progress now, blends together medieval meditative practices used in <em>lectio divina</em> with modern composition and cognitive theory to explore a series of ways in which readers can respond to spiritual texts. Each chapter outlines and explores a different discovery strategy, provides sample models of how to apply the strategy, and concludes with a suggested series of texts that might be fruitfully explored. The second study examines selected texts that teach and explore the mysteries of faith. Some are intended for a wide audience who are in need of basic teaching; some seem intended only for those who are initiated. What is expected of a reader of such texts? How do these texts “teach”? Do reader expectations and experience differ as you move from genre to genre, from printed text to art and architecture? Readings include medieval interpretations of the Hebrew Bible’s “Song of Solomon,” the morality play <em>Everyman</em>, the York crucifixion play, Julian of Norwich’s mystical writings, Bunyan’s <em>Pilgrim’s Progress</em>, George Herbert’s <em>The Temple</em>, Donne’s <em>Devotions on Emergent Occasions</em>, and Milton’s <em>Paradise Lost</em>.<br></p>Miller, Georgemiller<img alt="Candlelight on pages of bible" src="/ResearchProject/RESEARCH_Miller-iStock_000000845873Small_455.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />

 

 

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  • Department of English
  • 203 Memorial Hall
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • University of Delaware
  • Phone: 302-831-2361
  • english@udel.edu